Special collection Sept. 9-10 will aid Hurricane Harvey victims

Bishop Donald Kettler is asking parishes in the Diocese of St. Cloud to take up a special collection on the weekend of Sept. 9-10 to assist victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Funds collected will support emergency aid and recovery efforts under Catholic Charities USA as well as pastoral and rebuilding support to the affected dioceses through the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Volunteers are seen Sept. 2 at St. Mary of the Isle Church in Long Beach, N.Y., as they prepare boxes of relief supplies that were to be delivered by tractor-trailer to the victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)

Archbishop José Gomez of Los Angeles, vice president of the USCCB, sent a letter to all bishops Aug. 28 requesting the emergency collection.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to the families that have lost loved ones and to all who have lost homes and businesses along with their sense of normalcy. We also stand with our brother bishops in the region who have the difficult task of providing pastoral care in these most trying times while managing their own losses. Our prayerful and financial support is urgently needed,” he wrote.

Catholic Charities USA presented a $2 million check Sept. 4 representing donations received to date for immediate emergency assistance for those impacted by Hurricane Harvey and its catastrophic flooding.

One hundred percent of the funds raised will go directly to immediate and long-term recovery efforts.

Catholic Charities USA’s Mobile Response Center vehicle, filled with emergency supplies, left Catholic Charities headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia, for Texas and will remain there to assist Catholic Charities agencies with response efforts.

Diocesan Catholic Charities agencies have been hard at work in recovery efforts, trying to address difficulties as they arise.

In Houston, which has received the lion’s share of attention, there have been huge problems finding temporary housing. Apartments are flooded and hotels are not accepting payments from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. On top of that, the city is getting ready to shut down shelters.

Evacuees take shelter from Tropical Storm Harvey Aug. 28 in the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. (CNS photo/Texas Military Department handout via Reuters)

In Victoria, relief efforts are just getting started, as Catholic Charities is trying to find a building to convert into a distribution center. Cleaning supplies are still needed to cope with the aftermath of flooding.

While most volunteers want to go to southeast Texas, which suffered significant damage, five counties in the Diocese of Austin were also hit by Harvey. Catholic Charities personnel have gone door-to-door to hotels in Bryan and College Station trying to find displaced people, then connecting them to United Way, as hotels in the area are full due to the college football season. Some businesses are offering paid time off for their employees to go to impacted areas and do volunteer work.

In Corpus Christi, Catholic Charities USA workers are on the ground with people and resources. The biggest challenges they face include trying to find places to store donated supplies and relocating residents with no affordable housing available.

Trucks are a big issue in Beaumont and San Antonio. In Beaumont, six 18-wheelers arrived fully loaded with donations, and up to 100 volunteers stayed until 2 a.m. on Sept. 5 to unload them.

Beaumont’s water supply has remained sketchy since the storm. Water service has not been restored to all areas and those who do have water must boil it first.

With flooding still an issue, supply routes change daily and Catholic Charities faces the challenge of getting donations to the right places. They are also setting up food service for volunteers and survivors and looking for vehicles to deliver donations to outlying areas.

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Catholic News Service is the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' news and information service.

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