Berthold

died c. 1195 Feast Day March 29 Not much is known about this hermit who is considered by some historians to be the founder of the order of Carmelite friars. Various legends had him born in Limoges, France, educated at the University of Paris, and participating in the Crusades in Turkey. What is known is […]

Francesco Faa di Bruno

1825-1888 Feast Day March 27 This aristocratic Piedmontese Italian abandoned a military career for mathematics. Following studies at the Sorbonne in Paris, he began teaching at Italy’s University of Turin and doing charitable work among domestic servants, female apprentices and unmarried mothers. At the urging of St. John Bosco and despite episcopal opposition, Francesco was […]

Dismas 8

First Century Feast Date March 25 Two thieves were crucified with Christ; Dismas is the “good thief” who rebuked the other thief for reviling Jesus. In Luke’s Gospel, he accepts his guilt and proclaims Christ’s innocence. He asks Jesus to remember him, and Jesus promises, “Today you will be with me in paradise.” This feast […]

Cuthbert

c. 634–687 March 20 Cuthbert likely was a Northumbrian Englishman, orphaned as a child. He tended sheep and fought the Mercians, then became a monk at Melrose Abbey, and later its abbot. In 664 he accompanied St. Eata to Lindisfarne, or Holy Island, off the northeastern coast of England, and later undertook long journeys on […]

Joseph

First Century March 19 The husband of Mary, the mother of Jesus, and the legal father of Jesus according to Jewish law, Joseph is a model of humility and obedience to God’s will. He followed God’s instructions, given by angels in dreams, and took the pregnant Mary into his home as his wife, protected her […]

Cyril of Jerusalem

c. 315-386 Feast Date March 18 Cyril lived when the Arian heresy was roiling Christianity. Raised and educated in Jerusalem, he was ordained by St. Maximus and succeeded him as bishop of Jerusalem around 350. His episcopate lasted until his death, but he spent 16 years in exile, turned out by emperors influenced by the […]

Louise de Marillac

1590-1660 March 15 Born in Auvergne, France, Louise married an official of the royal court, Antoine Le Gras. Following his death in 1625, and despite strained finances and bouts of melancholy, she was an active supporter of St. Vincent de Paul’s charitable works and became co-founder with him of the Daughters of Charity. She drew […]

Clement Mary Hofbauer

1751-1820 March 15 A baker, Czech-born Johannes Hofbauer, after a period of solitary living and wandering between Rome and Vienna, established the Redemptorists north of the Alps and is considered the order?s second founder. He was ordained a Redemptorist priest at age 34 and served in Poland for 20 years, until 1808, when Napoleon suppressed […]

Katharine Drexel

1858 – 1955 March 3 The daughter of a wealthy Philadelphia banker, Katharine received marriage proposals but wanted to become a contemplative nun. After inheriting a fortune, she visited the Dakotas and witnessed American Indians’ poverty, subsequently pleading with Pope Leo XIII to send them more missionaries. But he and others encouraged her to found […]

Cyril and Methodius

ninth century February 14 These Greek brothers were distinguished even before they became “the apostles of the Slavs.” Cyril taught in Constantinople and Methodius was a provincial governor. About 863, after ordination, they went as missionaries to Moravia, where they had considerable success, partly because they knew the Slavonic language. But their mission was challenged […]